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Why you can’t afford to ignore pumpkin if you want bright glowy skin this Autumn

It’s now officially Autumn, which means it’s the season when our favourite little-known (read underrated) skincare ingredient gets its moment in the spotlight. So let’s talk Pumpkins. They might only get a month to shine on our socials (let’s face it, after 31st October they’re no longer fashionable Insta fodder) but in our bathroom cabinet they’re busy playing an important part all year round. 

Known to the skincare savvy as one of nature’s best exfoliants, pumpkin – and more specifically the enzymes found in pumpkin flesh - has a natural ability to dissolve and digest dead skin cells. Made up of AHA’s, it works in a similar way to glycolic and lactic acid, speeding up cell turnover, which means when it’s used in skincare products, pumpkin can transform dull complexions, leaving in its wake a clearer, clarified and more polished surface. In short, it’s why top skincare brands are turning to pumpkin to enrich their cleansers, sheet masks, serums and exfoliators. 

Pumpkin in skincare works like a magic wand on lacklustre skin: pumpkin enzymes plough gently away at dullness; the vitamin A it contains refines and tones (remember retinol is a form of vitamin A); and its vitamin C component brightens – which is why at Roccabox we tend to reach for pumpkin-enriched products when we’re deliberately trying to resurface and refine, combat congestion or when we want mega-watt levels of radiance (erm, always?). 

You don’t need to include pumpkin in your daily skincare routine if you don’t want: in fact, it can sometimes be more effective to use it in a more prescriptive way, relying on it to target certain specific skin complaints when they crop up. Our advice? Seek out products that identify pumpkin as the star ingredient when your complexion is looking duller than usual or when your serums and moisturisers aren’t sinking in – both can be signs your skin is clogged with dead surface cells.

Looking to pump up your glow with pumpkin? Here is our pick of the crop of pumpkin-rich skincare products:

Elemis Superfood AHA Glow Cleansing Butter - £30

Fermented pumpkin enzymes elevate the cleansing properties of this glow-getting buttery cleansing formula, making it an effective way to remove every last trace of make-up, pollutants and daily grime. Regular use when our skin is going through a dull patch gives us radiance levels that not many cleansers before it have managed to achieve.

Beauty Pro Pumpkin-infused Sheet Mask - £4.95* included in your October Roccabox

This serum-infused sheet mask is our go-to before a big night out, thanks to its major glow-getting credentials. Its ability to elevate our skin to dewiness of supermodel proportions is all down to pumpkin AHA’s and enzymes. We like to let it work its magic for twenty minutes before massaging in the excess for super glowy skin.

PAI Pomegranate and Pumpkin Seed Organic Stretch Mark System - £35

It’s the seeds of the pumpkin that play the starring role in this dual-product system, which has been formulated to tackle the appearance of stretch marks.  A combination of oils – including pumpkin seed - helps to restore elasticity, hydrate and promote suppleness, which then helps to reduce the look of stretch marks. Don’t get us wrong - it stops short of working complete miracles, but one of our team swears by it, having seen a definite improvement on post-pregnancy skin.  

Peter Thomas Roth Pumpkin Enzyme Mask - £50

This intense once-a-week treatment plays on pumpkin’s naturally exfoliating properties, recruiting them to decongest, resurface, refine and polish uneven, dull, lacklustre complexions. We keep it on hand for when our skin’s looking a little burned-out (post holiday or after a bout of illness) or on days when we need to dig that little bit deeper to get glowing.

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